The Dhammapada exploration – part 5: Fools

This is a series of articles I’m doing on one of the basic Buddhist texts, the Dhammapada. Read the rest of the articles in this series.

I’m back with another chapter of the Dhammapada. This time on the great subject of fools!

60. Long is the night to the sleepless; long is the league to the weary. Long is worldly existence to fools who know not the Sublime Truth.

The sleepless is like the one who has not known the dhamma, does not know how to end the cycle of existence.

61. Should a seeker not find a companion who is better or equal, let him resolutely pursue a solitary course; there is no fellowship with the fool.

Seek the company of those equal to you, or better, wiser than you. If you can’t find any such people, it is better to stay alone.

62. The fool worries, thinking, “I have sons, I have wealth.” Indeed, when he himself is not his own, whence are sons, whence is wealth?

You do not even own your own self. It is a delusion. How can you “own” sons or money?

63. A fool who knows his foolishness is wise at least to that extent, but a fool who thinks himself wise is a fool indeed.

Do you recognize this one? “I don’t know much, but I know what I don’t know.” This verse might have inspired that.

64. Though all his life a fool associates with a wise man, he no more comprehends the Truth than a spoon tastes the flavor of the soup.

65. Though only for a moment a discerning person associates with a wise man, quickly he comprehends the Truth, just as the tongue tastes the flavor of the soup.

A fool will not even know what to look for, even if he spends his entire life in the company of a wise one. But a discerning person (I like that expression) can take in great teachings.

66. Fools of little wit are enemies unto themselves as they move about doing evil deeds, the fruits of which are bitter.

67. Ill done is that action of doing which one repents later, and the fruit of which one, weeping, reaps with tears.

Yeah. You idiot. You shouldn’t have done that in the first place!

68. Well done is that action of doing which one repents not later, and the fruit of which one reaps with delight and happiness.

69. So long as an evil deed has not ripened, the fool thinks it as sweet as honey. But when the evil deed ripens, the fool comes to grief.

This can even be applied to little, petty things. Remember when you gossiped about that workmate? How stupid he is? Remember how you then planted rumors about him? That felt great. You felt so much better than that person. Mwahaha. But then they fired the guy, even though the rumors were not true. How did you feel then?

70. Month after month a fool may eat his food with the tip of a blade of grass, but he still is not worth a sixteenth part of the those who have comprehended the Truth.

Subscribing to extreme asceticism won’t make you a wise one. You can almost stop eating, you can sleep on a rock, you can live in a cave, but wisdom comes not from these actions but from inside.

71. Truly, an evil deed committed does not immediately bear fruit, like milk that does not turn sour all at once. But smoldering, it follows the fool like fire covered by ashes.

72. To his own ruin the fool gains knowledge, for it cleaves his head and destroys his innate goodness.

Wrong learning can lead you down the wrong path and ultimately destroy you.

73. The fool seeks undeserved reputation, precedence among monks, authority over monasteries, and honor among householders.

74. “Let both laymen and monks think that it was done by me. In every work, great and small, let them follow me” — such is the ambition of the fool; thus his desire and pride increase.

75. One is the quest for worldly gain, and quite another is the path to Nibbana. Clearly understanding this, let not the monk, the disciple of the Buddha, be carried away by worldly acclaim, but develop detachment instead.

Well, all that was pretty straightforward now, wasn’t it? Did you like it?

Review the reviewer: Yaroslaw Andrusyak

And in the same vein as my previous mention of mrdeathjr28, here is Yaroslaw Andrusyak. He presents games using only entirely FOSS drivers played via the Gears on Gallium live CD, with high OpenGL levels using the free Radeon drivers. And he even does comparisons between WINE and native ports. Here’s an example:

If you don’t know what the big deal is about that: Usually entirely free graphics drivers lag behind the latest proprietary drivers in speed or functionality or both. So it’s impressive when another title works beautifully and fluidly using entirely free drivers. The TL;DR might be “free software GUD. Prop.. Popiet.. Propi… CLOSED SOFTWARE BAD!!!!111 omg STEAM SALE!!!!”

Continue reading Review the reviewer: Yaroslaw Andrusyak

Review the reviewer: mrdeathjr28

For those Linux gamers among you who still have a few Windows games lying around, WINE, with or without PlayOnLinux, is a good option for running them on GNU/Linux. But do they run? If so, how well? The AppDB at winehq.org is usually very helpful to figure things out in text, but it would be nice to see stuff in motion sometimes.

mrdeathjr28 to the rescue. He does very, very detailed and thorough demo clips of various Windows games on WINE, with hardware specs, CPU load and all in the picture. The newer videos are encoded using NVENC so there isn’t much CPU load from encoding. Here’s an example:

It’s all in Spanish, but hey: gaming knows no language boundaries!!!!!!111 And who says the world always has to be in English? He’s not really a reviewer, more like an experimental gamer, but I thought I’d mention him anyway because his videos surely help decide whether it’s worth your time trying a particular game on WINE.

Go check him out.

The Dhammapada exploration – part 4: Flowers/Blossoms

This is a series of articles I’m doing on one of the basic Buddhist texts, the Dhammapada. Read the rest of the articles in this series.

Let’s dive right into chapter 4, woohoo!

44. Who shall overcome this earth, this realm of Yama and this sphere of men and gods? Who shall bring to perfection the well-taught path of wisdom as an expert garland-maker would his floral design?

Yama is a sort of gatekeeper and judge of the hell realms, one who decides about which rebirth you get. This is uncomfortably close to the Abrahamic god-concept for me personally, and the only consolation I have is that Buddhist concepts of gods, hungry ghosts, hell-beings,  etc. are not beyond nature like in those religions, but part of our universe.

Continue reading The Dhammapada exploration – part 4: Flowers/Blossoms

Did your mouse turn all weird in Debian and now you suck at Quake?

If you have a recent Debian testing release, you might have noticed that your mouse now behaves very differently. For me, I noticed it when my aiming turned wobbly in Quake. Quake has extremely tight controls and shouldn’t feel as if you’re playing a 2016 console FPS with jelly dildos in place of fingers. So I was a bit surprised when it suddenly did. Also, I couldn’t reliably hit e.g. a close button on a window or the menu entry I wanted.

Continue reading Did your mouse turn all weird in Debian and now you suck at Quake?

The Dhammapada exploration – part 3: The Mind

This is a series of articles I’m doing on one of the basic Buddhist texts, the Dhammapada. Read the rest of the articles in this series.

Now we’re getting to a juicy part, one of the most fertile subjects for Buddhists to talk about: the mind. We’ve seen some of this in part 1, where it was established that phenomena are mind-wrought. Since Buddhism often occupies itself with phenomena, here’s a whole chapter of the Dhammapada just about the mind. I’m using the Buddharakkhita translation this time, but just because Thanissaro’s is a bit hard to copy/paste from. Do read both versions if you’re interested, there is a link to Thanissaro’s on the page at Access to Insight.

Continue reading The Dhammapada exploration – part 3: The Mind

The Dhammapada exploration – part 2: Heedfulness

This is a series of articles I’m doing on one of the basic Buddhist texts, the Dhammapada. Read the rest of the articles in this series.

New resources

I’d like to introduce some more useful resources for the Buddhist learner:

  • A very fast Pali dictionary. At some point in your studies you will develop a sort of suspicion of which Pali words translators meant when you read certain English words (“mind” and “heart” both pointing to mana is one example, but mana can also mean consciousness, so which one is it?).I find it sometimes helps to have multiple definitions of a word and reverse-engineering things from the original Pali can be enlightening. But don’t think that you have to do this to understand. Native English-speaking authors and teachers can drive those Pali points home just as well in English, even if English is lacking a lot of spiritual vocabulary.
  • Digital Dictionaries of South Asia Pali Dictionary.
  • Another Pali dictionary.
  • Treasury of Truth’s Illustrated Dhammapada. Next to being beautifully illustrated, it often gave me more concise explanations of the verses to work from than I could have found myself so easily.

Continue reading The Dhammapada exploration – part 2: Heedfulness