Where will you step when there is no more safe ground?

You thought you’re safe and you have privacy because you use some fancy-schmancy encrypted email provider? I don’t think so.

This year saw some remarkable changes, bear with me while I go off on some tangents:

  • The UK voted to leave the EU and subsequently introduced one of the most far-reaching and invasive surveillance laws in the world.
  • The USA elected Donald Trump under speculations of Russian involvement, possibly thawing US-Russian relations and forcing Edward Snowden to be extradited to the US, where he might be executed for revealing truths the US didn’t want revealed. Keep in mind that he never invented anything, he didn’t lie, unlike the US President-elect. He merely told the truth.
  • Switzerland, who was formerly ready to offer asylum to Snowden, was pressured by the US government to stop that. All the while, US intelligence agencies were illegaly patrolling through Swiss cities and running surveillance operations in Berne and Geneva. The Swiss government stopped any investigation of these operations after the US increased their pressure.

Continue reading Where will you step when there is no more safe ground?

Time to leave Dyn and go to something like Afraid.org/FreeDNS

Now that Oracle is rumored to be taking over Dyn, this should be the last signal you need: Dyn is nothing like the cute little company called DynDNS that we liked so much in the 90s of the last century. Remember talking on IRC when someone gives you an address for an FTP hosted via their 28.8k modem on flyingdickweasels.dyndns.org? No? Damn, I’m too old, then!

Dyn has become more and more corporate over the years and is nothing like the cool little company that gave so many of our younger selves free dynamic DNS. But you know who’s a cool little company with free dynamic DNS? Afraid.org/FreeDNS. It used to be that afraid.org’s dynamic DNS mode isn’t directly supported in home router firmware or NAS devices, but that’s changed. Even Synology NAS now support it easily. If your router doesn’t have support for it, you can get it to work on anything that can run shell scripts, Windows batch scripts or PowerShell. Instructions are included when you set up your domain.

They also support the nice trick of using your own custom domain and dynamically updating its subdomains, but you’ll have to pay US$ 30/year for a pro account if you need that. If you just want to use their top-level domains and don’t need your own, that’s still free and has been for over a decade. They own chickenkiller.com, for example. You can work with that, can’t you?

Full disclosure: I’m not paid anything for this. I’ve just been a happy afraid.org customer for more than 10 years now without a single issue, and I laugh in the face of Dyn, whose slide into zombie corporate culture couldn’t find a more fitting end than being absorbed by the ultimate peddler in corporate zombieism; Oracle.

The Dhammapada exploration – part 20: The path

At some point the Buddha promised that he knows some wild tricks that could make annoyances and stupidity disappear from your life. He was talking about dukkha, but that word doesn’t have a good translation; “suffering” it ain’t. Think of dukkha more as unpleasantness, an unsatisfied state, things going not quite as they should. It is said the word comes from the sound a wagon’s wheel makes when one of its spokes is broken — dukkhadukkhadukkhadukkha. So things aren’t quite round and smooth.

Following the Buddha’s path to liberation requires treading the Noble Eightfold Path. So let’s hear how the Dhammapada advertises this cool product:

273. Of all the paths the Eightfold Path is the best; of all the truths the Four Noble Truths are the best; of all things passionlessness is the best: of men the Seeing One (the Buddha) is the best.

Of course it would be the best!

Continue reading The Dhammapada exploration – part 20: The path

A modern example of Christian proselytizing in Cambodia

TL;DR: A bunch of Christian missionaries are destroying Cambodian culture in exchange for  building orphanages and schools, and a guy made a film about it. It’s full of vague statements and misinformation about Buddhism.

It’s not really news that Christian missionaries use very creative means to get the native population of an area to adopt Christianity. Catholic priest Diego de Landa Calderón for example grew furious about the fact that the people of the Yucatán region continued worshipping their old gods along with the new Christian god he had only just forcibly thrust up their asses.

Now what would a sane, wise and compassionate person do in this situation? Perhaps accept the fact that whatever belief system you hold as a Catholic priest, there are other belief systems that were there before you arrived. And your own system might not be the right one for everyone, even if your holy book says so and even though your religion instructs you to spread it. A wise one would perhaps acknowledge that there is value in these people’s culture and beauty in the way they adapt their own religion to fit the new Christian god right into their own pantheon.

What did Landa do instead? He systematically wiped out their entire written history of the people he conquered and destroyed every last trace of their culture and religion, robbing all future generations of their identity and annoying historians to this day. Bravo! A good Catholic if there ever was one.

Continue reading A modern example of Christian proselytizing in Cambodia

My favorite vim color schemes have been ported to Atom

The PaperColor theme has been my favorite vim color theme for quite some time now, and I’m happy to find the same theme in Atom as well, even by the same author!

They have been ported to the Base16 color scheme system. If that doesn’t mean anything to you, it doesn’t matter at all. Thanks a lot, Nguyen Nguyen, aka NLKNguyen. If I knew how to reach you, I’d send you beer money.

 

The Dhammapada exploration – part 19: The just/the judge

It’s Sunday, so it’s time to catch up on our Dhammapada reading! Buddhism gives some advice on judging, and as we’ve learned earlier, prejudice is particularly frowned upon. But Buddhism never goes into the “hey man, don’t judge!” hippie territory either. Instead, you should reflect on the proper things and in the proper way before reaching judgment on something or someone.

Now what are these proper ways? Let’s have a look.

256. Not by passing arbitrary judgments does a man become just; a wise man is he who investigates both right and wrong.

257. He who does not judge others arbitrarily, but passes judgment impartially according to the truth, that sagacious man is a guardian of law and is called just.

Continue reading The Dhammapada exploration – part 19: The just/the judge

Applied Buddhism: Fight your inner demons on a higher plane

The demon shown above this post is Mara, the tempter. It’s no wonder folklore uses demons to represent temptation and struggle; that’s exactly what they look like while you’re fighting them. And the fight can be won.

Here’s some shameless self-marketing to see if I can trick you into reading on: during the last nine months, I’ve battled three addictions at the same time and destroyed them. They were:

  1. Alcohol. I used to drink up to three strong beers (7 – 14%) and a whiskey every evening. During the last 6 months, I had exactly five beers and one whiskey total.
  2. Game sales. I used to watch out for new games to buy in game sales, scouring half a dozen websites, subscribing to price comparison services, wasting so much time that I never actually played the games I bought. I only bought one thing from a game sale since March and played through my backlog instead.
  3. Coffee. I used to drink five to seven cups a day. Now I drink one in the morning.

I don’t say this just to enjoy the smell of my own farts, but more because I think I’ve discovered a connection between these types of addiction that can be used to control them, and I think anyone can practice to do the same.

Continue reading Applied Buddhism: Fight your inner demons on a higher plane